How to seasaon a new grill or smoker.

Whatever kind or type of new grill or smoker you decide to purchase, they will need to be seasoned before using.  It is true, as you use your unit it will become seasoned but they still require that first time seasoning.  It is unsure what is really in or on the metal inside your new unit be we want to get rid of all the impurities and other unwelcomed things in our grilling units.  The food will taste so much better once seasoning is done.

Once your unit is ready to be turned on for the first time, add your favorite cooking spray.  I use Olive Oil Cooking Spray to the entire inside.  Liberally spray to everything in site, top to bottom and side to side, coating it all.  Fire up the unit and allow to set for about 45 minutes to an hour.  We recommend setting the temperature to around 275 – 300 degrees F.  Please check your buyers guide for any additional information and recommended temperature.

Once the initial seasoning is complete, it is ok to begin your cooking.  I recommend using the spray oil prior to cooking for several times to continue the seasoning process.

Good luck with your new cooking unit and enjoy.

We always love to hear from you.  What are your thoughts to seasoning?  Do you have a different process to take away the newness of a cooking unit?

Please let us know.  Thanks

4 Comments on "How to seasaon a new grill or smoker."

  1. I’ve always found that the information on your website is very useful.

    I’ve literally cooked hundreds of pounds of meat on the grills and smokers that I’ve bought and never once thought to season them. I figured the heat would take care of any impurities.

    Me and my family are really into using coconut oil do you think this would work just fine?

    What’s the latest food you’ve cooked?

    I’m planning on cooking some brisket this weekend 🙂 I’ll be checking into your recipes here shortly.

    Do you have one for spicy sauce?

    • I am so glad you like my page so much. It is on the grow so keep checking back with us for additional information.
      I have always done at least one seasoning heat session with all my smokers and grills. Sometimes the paint and other impurities will burn and leave a bad taste on the food. It is highly recommended by this pitmaster and many other even the manufactures.

      Coconut oil has a really high smoke temperature of 350 degrees F. That would be fine especially if you like coconuts, I do not, don’t even like the smell of them. Olive oil has a smoke temperature of much lower around 200 degrees. It usually burns off the inside of the smoker but coconut oil would not. You could run the temperature up to around 300-350 for your seasoning burn off.

      I cook almost daily. I own a BBQ food truck, Burnt Offerings BBQ, we cook and serve 5 days a week. We have many items but the usual is Pulled pork, brisket and burnt ends and more.

      Brisket is one of my favorites to cook and eat. You can find my recipe at https://bbqsmokeandmore.com/smoked-brisket.

  2. Thank you ever so much for this recommendation. I am very novice to the art of using a bbq, but now you mention doing a pre-seasoning of your grill, I can see the point wholly. I imagine often bbq are kept on displays in shops, or stuck up in warehouses before being packed for sale, and yes, call me fussy, but the idea of how much dust they may have gathered does not really appeal to me.
    One thought about it, though: do you think it best practice to wash your bbq before giving it that first seasoning?
    Look forward to hearing from you 🙂

    • The main reason for doing the first time seasoning of your grill is to get rid of all that dust and other impurities and to burn off paint and oil.
      Washing it alone would not do the trick it does need that high heat for about an hour to ensure those nasty tasting impurities are burned away. Some grills have parts that shouldn’t get wet and left undried. These parts could rust enough to not work properly.
      Thanks for stopping by our site. Please come back again to see how we have grown.

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